"Cruise of the Zaca", a precious documentary directed and narrated by Errol Flynn

Errol Flynn sailing – Cine Gratia Cinema

“Like a bird with great wings, the movement of a sailing ship is the poetry of motion.” 
– Errol Flynn

"Cruise of the Zaca" (1952, Errol Flynn) is a short documentary directed, starring and narrated by the actor who immortalized Robin Hood. Buried under a whole load of bonus material that accompanies an Errol Flynn classic, we find this little treasure coming from the Caribbean Sea. In association with the Scripps Institute of Oceanography, the actor used his schooner, the Zaca, and financed a series of scientific expeditions intended for marine research. It's a "thoughtful little film"(1) that reveals his deep love for sailing, his "inherited" interest in biology and his genuine adventurous nature. Surrounded by family and friends, Errol opened up the doors to his own paradise. Do not miss out on the opportunity for a fantastic journey aboard the Zaca. Prepare to be amazed.

The Great Orson Welles

The Great Orson Welles


George Orson Welles was born on May 6th, 1915 and died on October 10th, 1985, with a typewriter on his lap. He was writing a new script. A film director, producer, actor, scriptwriter, author of essays, plays, stories and even newspaper columnist, he was a prolific and versatile artist and, above all, a great illusionist with a magic conception of the show, so much different from others.

His last appearance was a few days before his death, on the television series Moonlighting (1985-89, Glenn Gordon Caron). The 4th episode of the 2nd season, The Dream Sequence Always Rings Twice, opens with an introduction from Orson Welles. This episode pays tribute to the classic noir films of the 1940s.

On the occasion of the celebration of the 100th anniversary of his birth, we want this post to be a small tribute to a magnificent artist, who never ceased to amaze us.


A Gothic Approach to "Rope"



Alfred Hitchcock's universe offers more than a three dimensional spectacle to many viewers, myself included. As a true magician, his extensive knowledge on human perception leads us to the intended illusion. The more we watch a movie, the more we are able to glimpse different facets calling our attention, as elements of a larger and fascinating framework. At least, that is what happened to me, as I enjoyed "Rope" (1948), for the zillionth time. A traditional English ghost story, which also features an old chest, is referenced in the film. That allusion prompted me to write a post on a Gothic perspective, in order to embroil ourselves in one of Hitchcock's most notable literary influences.

BOOK REVIEW: "The Bear That Wasn't" by Frank Tashlin



One of my last year's "happiest discoveries", was Frank Tashlin's career as an animator, cartoonist and author. It has been an incredibly rewarding experience to stumble upon this publication, just like Vincent Price's extraordinary cookbook in my previous post. The Bear That Wasn’t (1946)(1) is a critical and satirical fable that discusses the loss of identity in the midst of a booming economy and a challenging society that is based on the use of labels. It is a great book for children but for adults as well. A delightful yet gritty story that will leave an indelible mark.

Once upon a time, that wasn't...


BOOK REVIEW: "A Treasury of Great Recipes", a magnificent culinary legacy by Vincent Price

 A Treasury of Great Recipes, gif, Cine Gratia Cinema



Little did I imagine that reading a food blog, I would discover such literary jewell: an original cookbook written by legendary actor Vincent Price. A Treasury of Great Recipes is a thorough compendium of the most exquisite recipes, carefully curated from his many trips around the world. Along with his second wife, costume designer Mary Grant, he visited some of the finest restaurants of the time. Now, this book is, by no means, just another exotic and sophisticated recipe book. We are talking about Vincent Price here. To be honest, this publication holds extraordinary value, not only from the gastronomic point of view but also as a testimony of a genuine philosophy of life. A mouth-watering trip back in time through the lives and times of Mr. and Mrs. Price. I can't think of a better way to treat yourself, than to try a few of these wonderful recipes à la Vincent Price. Fasten your seat belts, it's gonna be a yummy night!

FAVORITE FILMS: "Who's Minding the Store?"



Fifty years have gone by since the Spanish release of "Who's Minding the Store?" (1963, Frank Tashlin), on the 21st of December 1964. During this time, it has become one of Jerry Lewis best remembered films. Legendary scenes, such as the "Typewriter" scene, have delighted many movie fans, specially in Spain, where it became a classic. Undoubtedly, this is one of my favorite films that I keep on watching it just for the sake of enjoying, over and over again, those beloved scenes. Over the years, its depiction of those funny catastrophes originated in a department store, seems to me to be more lucid and timeless than ever. Similarly, its dialogues are now located in my personal Gourmet section. A very special space in my mind, where great comedies deserve to be.

Welcome to Tuttle's.


HIDDEN TREASURES... "It's a Wonderful Life"



On the 20th of December 1946, with a half-hearted response from the public and the critics, it was released one of the monumental and most emblematic films of all time. Later turned into a Christmas classic, this movie is one of the best examples of Frank Capra's style and also an intense tale about existence and human's life experience in all its dimensions.

This production of the short-lived company Liberty Films, was developed outside the studio system and therefore it may be considered as Capra's most personal work, after his return to filming following the end of WWII. Fraught with details, references and the meticulous work of many professional who thoroughly mastered every dialogue, every frame and every sequence. Every time I watch it, it's a confirmation that this film was carefully crafted, with countless layers. I would like to highlight some features of this splendid work and a few interesting details that I loved discovering and now sharing.